A Threat of a Lawsuit Isn’t Always Enough to Engage the Litigation Privilege Allowing a Defendant to Shield Documents from Production

McKay v Home Depot of Canada Inc, 2022 NSSC 73. 
By: Weston McArthur (Student-at-Law) 
Reading Time: 4 Minutes 
Sometime in 2016, the McKays (the Plaintiffs) had renovations done to their house that involved 
the installation of new hardwood floors and a bathroom shower. They bought everything from 
Home Depot (the Defendant), which hired a third party to handle installation. 
The Plaintiffs were happy with the renovations. From February 2017 until the end of 2018, they 
communicated consistently with the Defendanst about fixing the renovations. While the floors 
were eventually replaced, they remained unhappy because the shower issues remained 
unresolved. 
In December 2018, the Plaintiffs retained legal counsel and sued the Defendant. The Plaintiffs 
wanted the Defendant to give them access to various internal correspondences concerning their 
case; however, the Defendant claimed litigation privilege over those materials. The materials in 
question included, for example, notes that an employee of the Defendant took during the course 
of a March 2018 phone call in which the Plaintiff threatened to take the matter to court if not 
resolved. 
A party relying on litigation privilege does not need to disclose the protected materials to the 
opposing party. For litigation privilege to apply, two requirements must be met: firstly, litigation 
must be existing or there must be a strong indication that it is imminent; secondly, the primary 
reason for creating the document/correspondence must have been in preparation for that 
litigation. 
The Nova Scotia Supreme Court ruled that these notes did not meet the requirements to be 
protected by litigation privilege. Firstly, the Plaintiff’s threat was not an indication that litigation 
was forthcoming, but was instead within the scope of a frustrated customer lodging a complaint 
to a retailer during discussion about resolving that complaint (discussion which continued for 
many month before legal counsel was retained). Secondly, the notes were not created for the 
purpose of preparing for litigation, but in the course of attempting to resolve the customer’s 
complaints without needing to resort to litigation. As it was determined that litigation privilege 
did not apply to the materials, the Defendants were required to turn them over to the Plaintiff. 

Related Posts